The Mystery of the Missing Treasure Chest - a family adventure through medieval Turku is a brand new guided tour, during which you get to know Turku in medieval times, through an inspiring story.

Guided by the maids and servants of the medieval merchant's house, the world of Turku Cathedral and the old town centre in the Middle Ages becomes clear. What was a medieval school like? How can we study the past through archaeological excavation?

The Mystery of the Missing Treasure Chest is designed for the whole family, but it offers the best experience for young children aged around 4-8 years old. Of course, adults will also enjoy the tour, and the children can participate together with their accompanying adult.

The tour starts in front of the Cathedral and continues through the Great Old Square to the Aboa Vetus Ars Nova Museum, where the tour ends (NB! To make the plot a surprise, keep the locations a secret from the children of the group before you begin!).

The tour is conducted on foot with the walking distance about 500 metres. For the most part, the tour is also suitable for parents pushing a pram or stroller, with just a few places where you’ll find awkward cobblestone paths as well as the stairs inside Aboa Vetus (prams can be left in the museum lobby).

Duration: approx. 2 hours

Recommended group size: min. 10-person group, max. 40-persons

Recommended age: the tour is best suited for young children aged 4-8 years, and is free for children under 4 years

Availability: Mon-Sat all year round, subject to museum opening hours

Prices: tour guide (2 guides for the whole tour) €270 + €5 /per, prices higher on Sundays and public holidays

Includes: 2 hours of guidance, plus a surprise at Aboa Vetus

For an additional fee: entrance fee to Aboa Vetus (where you can stay at the end of the tour), guidance in Aboa Vetus after the tour

Accessibility

For the most part, the tour is suitable for participants with physical disabilities but there are some cobblestone paths along the route.

About one third of the exhibition spaces in Aboa Vetus can be explored with an electric wheelchair. Unfortunately, there is no barrier-free access to the Bony Tales and Mouseum exhibitions currently on display. In some cases for those requiring less assistance, it is possible to move around the whole area, as long as there is someone to provide necessary assistance at the steps and paved areas. The unevenness of the space is due to the historical nature of the museum.